JTA Blogs

Keeping Your Top Talent, Mistake #2

Practically every company these days wants to keep their top talent, even though they may be letting go of others due to the economy.   The Harvard Business Review (5.2010) reports that programs aimed to keep top talent are often not very effective.


Keeping Your Top Talent, Mistake #1

Practically every company these days wants to keep their top talent, no matter that others may be let go due to the economy.   The Harvard Business Review (5.2010) reports that programs aimed to keep top talent are often not very effective.
 
Mistake #1: Assuming that High Potentials are Highly Engaged.
Did you know that nearly 40% of internal job moves involving high potentials end in failure? Instead, here's what to do: 
1.  Identify who your High Potentials really are and give them lots of stimulating work, recognition and the chance to prosper. 
2.  Pay attention--give your top executives a quarterly list of your best and brightest with a few words about their strengths. When a young high potential gets a personal call many levels above their Boss they pay attention. 
3.  Don't delegate talent development to line managers. That only encourages hoarding of talent. Manage it at the corporate level.
4.  Don't assume high potentials will take one for the team or buy in to the idea of "run time". Offer A players differentiated compensation and exposure to key executives for mentoring. 


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